Archive for the ‘Training’ Category

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W3C HTML5 training course – New session starts 3 June!

May 30, 2013

Learn HTML5 cool new features and code slimming techniques that will hep you build interactive, powerful and efficient Web sites! Whatever you’re a beginner or a high level developer/designer, have access to high quality content material, be trained by a first-class expert, and learn step by step.

Registration is open for the W3C HTML5 training course that starts 3 June 2013 and lasts six weeks. Experienced trainer Michel Buffa will cover the techniques developers and designers need to create great Web pages and apps. Topics include video, animations, forms, and APIs to create location-based services, as well as offline applications. Students receive a certificate upon course completion.

Read the students’ feedback, as well as what was the trainer’s experience during the first course session earlier this year.

HTML5 simply rocks — enroll now!
During this 6 weeks long online training course, you will notably:

  • Learn the new simplified HTML5 tags
  • Play with the and elements
  • Draw and animate fun Web graphics
  • Discover the newest HTML5 forms features
  • Test the geolocation, orientation APIs and much more
  • Understand the HTML5 offline features

Register and learn more about W3DevCampus, W3C’s online training for Web developers.

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New HTML5 training course! – Early bird until 22 Feb.

February 15, 2013

W3C HTML5 logo

W3C is pleased to launch a new “HTML5″ training course!

Experienced trainer Michel Buffa will cover the techniques developers and designers need to create great Web pages and apps. Topics include video, animations, forms, and APIs to create location-based services, and offline applications.

The W3C HTML5 online course starts 18 March and lasts six weeks. Students will have access to high quality content material, be trained by a first-class expert, and receive a certificate upon course completion.

During the HTML5 course, students will:

  • Learn the new simplified HTML5 tags
  • Play with the <audio> and <video> elements
  • Draw and animate fun Web graphics
  • Discover the newest HTML5 forms features
  • Test the geolocation, orientation APIs and much more
  • Understand the HTML5 offline features

Read the W3C HTML5 training detailed course description, and register before February 22 to benefit from the early bird rate.

Learn more about W3DevCampus, the W3C online training for Web developers.

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New training course on Game development in HTML5

October 6, 2011

W3C is pleased to announce a brand new W3C online training course dedicated to “Game development in HTML5”. The objective of this course is to have students use open Web technologies such as HTML5, CSS3 & JavaScript to create browser based multiplayer games.

W3C HTML5 logoIn this course, students will learn:

  • about the current state of JavaScript games
  • what are the HTML5 elements useful in game development
  • how to use HTML5 animation and CSS3 transitions
  • about collision detection and basic physics
  • how to implement multiplayer gameplay
  • how to deploy your game in the appstores

A snapshot of the course content is available in the course description below.

Taught by Michal Budzynski, the course will last 4 weeks, from 31 October to 27 November 2011.

To ensure your place on the course, do enroll now! The full price of the course is €225 but we have a limited number of seats available at the early bird rate of €145, open until 22 October 2011. Enroll now and benefit from the early bird rate!

Who should attend?

Course is prepared for both – Web Developers interested in creating games and Game Developers who wants to create games for Web browsers.

Prerequisites

Basic knowledge of HTML, JavaScript & CSS.

How does this work?

The online course is delivered as a series of 4 modules, one per week. Each module presents information as one or more lectures and includes an assignment and some other activity. The material for the week is made available on each Monday morning (at the latest). You should aim to complete the week’s work by the following weekend although assignments will be accepted up until the end of the course.

You can participate in the course from any time zone. When you choose to work on the material and assignments is entirely up to you. It is anticipated that you will need to spend around 2-3 hours per week on the course (as an average).

Interaction between participants is strongly encouraged through the discussion forum. The discussion forum is open at all times and the teachers will usually respond in good time, especially during (European) office hours.

All course material is presented in English. Assignments must also be submitted in English. Participants may post messages to the discussion forum in any language.

How Do I get a Certificate of Completion?

The course includes 4 practical tutor-marked assignments (TMAs) that all need to be completed satisfactorily if you are to receive a certificate of completion.

What do I need?

All material is delivered via the Web and so is accessible on any browser. The course is hosted by a Moodle platform. Participants are allocated an account on the training system and this grants access to course materials and the a dedicated discussion forum. Register now!

About the trainer: Michal Budzynski

Michal Budzynski photo Michal is a JavaScript developer from Poland with strong game development background, currently working for GG Network (owner of Gadu-Gadu, the biggest Polish instant messaging client). He has created one of the most popular Canvas HTML5 game tutorials – html5gametutorial.mibbu.eu. He recently organized onGameStart, the first HTML5 games event, in his home country Poland.
Michal is also creator of the first PhoneGap implementation for Samsung Bada system. As a Javascript trainer he has run technical workshops in many countries such as France, Bulgaria, Poland, Italy or Brazil. JavaScript is not just his job – it’s his lifestyle. Follow Michal @michalbe

Course description: “Game Development in HTML5”

During the workshop you will learn how to use Open Web Technologies such as JavaScript, CSS3 & HTML5 to create browser based multiplayer games. We will discuss and compare different methods of real-time animation, implementing game loop, structure of the code or communication between the players. Logic of our games will be based on an engine we will write – it will be able to animate sprites, detect collisions, add basic physics to our characters and much more. Finally, you will learn how to run your game as a desktop application outside the browser on MacOSX, Linux & Windows, or as a native application on your mobile device. And how to sell it in the appstores.

Each week ends with a practical assignement.

Week 1: Introduction to HTML5/JavaScript game development

We will remind basics of JavaScript & HTML5, learn how to manipulate Document Object Model and draw on canvas element. We will test different methods of implementing game loop and user controls. An history of JavaScript games will also be presented.
Week 1 assignment: “Create single object on a scene and control it using mouse or/and keyboard.”

Week 2: Let’s make it move!

We will discuss different methods of sprite animation using HTML5 and remind information about basics of physics from high school. We will also learn how to detect collisions between objects.
Week 2 assignment: “Create animated character that could jump on the platforms on the scene.”

Week 3: Connecting with other players

We will review methods for connecting players. Then, we will check if it is possible to connect two browsers without worrying about the server side scripts. We will also learn how to implement multiplayer gameplay in our games.
Week 3 assignment: “Add multiplayer support to your game.”

Week 4: Deploying your game

Last but not least – we will explore the power of JavaScript, CSS3 & HTML5 outside the desktop browser. We will add native features of your mobile phone like accelerometer or vibrations and publish your game in the app stores.
Week 4 assignement: “Create package with your game for mobile devices using described frameworks or publish it as a desktop application for different operating systems.”

Terms and conditions

The training course is offered subject to the following terms and conditions.

  • W3C will deliver the course in line with the published description for the advertised fee.
  • Payment must be made, in full, at the time of registration.
  • Payment is processed using either a credit card or a PayPal account.
  • Participants may withdraw from the course at any time after registration.
  • Refunds will only be made if the participant withdraws within the first week of the online course.
  • W3C intends to continue to make the course material available to registered participants for at least 2 months after the course has ended.
  • All material, including that produced by participants, in assignments and correspondence is copyrighted property and cannot be copied, duplicated, posted on another Web site, or otherwise used without the original author’s consent. Conversations and posted messages are private and cannot be copied, duplicated, forwarded, or conveyed to anyone else without the original author’s permission.

Questions?

Please write to training@w3.org . Thx.

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New training course on HTML5 Audio & Video

September 27, 2011

We are pleased to announce the launch of a brand new W3C online training course dedicated to “HTML5 Audio and Video”. The objective of this course is to make students familiar enough with HTML5 media so that they can use and manipulate it in their Web pages and applications.

Students will learn:

  • about the current state of HTML5 audio and video
  • how to integrate HTML5 media into their Web pages
  • how to encode media to make it suitable for the Web
  • how to build and customize their own media players
  • how to integrate HTML5 media with other HTML5 elements
  • how to use HTML5 media in games and other richer experiences
  • about the integration with mobile platforms

A snapshot of the course content is available in the course description below.

Taught by Mark Boas, the course will last 5 weeks, from 17 October to 20 November 2011.

To ensure your place on the course, do enroll now! The full price of the course is €225 but we have a limited number of seats available at the early bird rate of €145, open until 12 October 2011. Enroll now and benefit from the early bird rate!

Who should attend?

People who want to learn about the potential of HTML5 Rich Media and who have an interest in using HTML5 audio and video APIs to create rich media Web solutions.

Prerequisites

Web developers and designers with a fair to good working knowledge of HTML, CSS and JavaScript.

How does this work?

The online course is delivered as a series of 5 modules, one per week. Each module presents information as one or more lectures and includes an assignment and some other activity. The material for the week is made available on each Monday morning (at the latest). You should aim to complete the week’s work by the following weekend although assignments will be accepted up until the end of the course.

You can participate in the course from any time zone. When you choose to work on the material and assignments is entirely up to you. It is anticipated that you will need to spend around 2-3 hours per week on the course (as an average).

Interaction between participants is strongly encouraged through the discussion forum. The discussion forum is open at all times and the teachers will usually respond in good time, especially during (European) office hours.

All course material is presented in English. Assignments must also be submitted in English. Participants may post messages to the discussion forum in any language.

How Do I get a Certificate of Completion?

The course includes 5 practical tutor-marked assignments (TMAs) that all need to be completed satisfactorily if you are to receive a certificate of completion.

What do I need?

All material is delivered via the Web and so is accessible on any browser. The course is hosted by a Moodle platform. Participants are allocated an account on the training system and this grants access to course materials and the a dedicated discussion forum. Register now!

About the trainer: Mark Boas

Mark Boas photoMark Boas is a Web developer with over 12 years experience of developing sites and applications for the Web. Active in the community he speaks at international and local events and blogs when time permits. Mark divides his day between research and development and is project co-ordinator of jPlayer, the successful JavaScript media library with a growing community of over 1500 developers. Mark creates projects demonstrating the potential of jPlayer and helps out on the community forum. In addition Mark is involved with the W3C audio group. Recently Mark has been experimenting with a new and interesting technology dubbed hyperaudio. More details of Mark’s work can be found at http://happyworm.com

Course description: “HTML5 Audio & Video”

Using HTML5, CSS and JavaScript, students will learn as they build increasingly comprehensive media players and solutions. By learning about the underlying technology, the aim is that the student will understand the full potential of the media, the tools and the tricks of the trade. Armed with this sound knowledge of HTML5 audio and video and its potential, students will be able to confidently create cross-browser HTML5 based audio/video solutions.

Each week ends with a practical assignment.

Week 1: Introduction to HTML5 Media

We look at the back-story of media on the Web and where we are and then launch into creating our very own media player using HTML5. We’ll start with the basics and take you the various capabilities of the <audio> and <video> tags and the API, while keeping a firm grasp of the pragmatic issues that a developer will need to tackle to create cross browser solutions.
Week 1 assignment: “Creating your first basic audio and video player”

Week 2: Tools of the trade

HTML5 media must be correctly encoded to ensure maximum compatibility throughout the various target platforms. We explore the various tools and services available to encode and host our media and then delve deeper into the extensive HTML5 media API to take our player to the next level.
Week 2 assignment: “Encode your own media”

Week 3: Media player controls

We take a look at the various controls and feedback that we need to create to provide a comprehensive media player and explore the mechanisms that lie behind them.
Week 3 assignment: “Add a functional progress bar to your audio and video players”

Week 4: Playlists

One of the most desired functions for audio and sometimes video players is the ability to have playlists. Playlists allow you to order a number of pieces of media for sequential playback.
Week 4 assignment: “Add a playlist to your audio player and add subtitles to your video player”

Week 5: Integrating Video with other HTML5 Elements

One of the great advantages of HTML5 media is that it can interact with other HTML elements, we can have a lot of fun with this.
Week 5 assignment: “Integrate canvas or WebGL with video, and create audio spot effects”

Terms and conditions

The training course is offered subject to the following terms and conditions.

  • W3C will deliver the course in line with the published description for the advertised fee.
  • Payment must be made, in full, at the time of registration.
  • Payment is processed using either a credit card or a PayPal account.
  • Participants may withdraw from the course at any time after registration.
  • Refunds will only be made if the participant withdraws within the first week of the online course.
  • W3C intends to continue to make the course material available to registered participants for at least 2 months after the course has ended.
  • All material, including that produced by participants, in assignments and correspondence is copyrighted property and cannot be copied, duplicated, posted on another Web site, or otherwise used without the original author’s consent. Conversations and posted messages are private and cannot be copied, duplicated, forwarded, or conveyed to anyone else without the original author’s permission.

Questions?

Please write to training@w3.org . Thx.

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Call for Trainers: “HTML5 for Rich Media”

June 30, 2011

HTML5 logoW3C is looking for trainers to create and teach courses on HTML5-based “rich-media” Web content including:

  • Video/audio sites based on HTML5
  • Design and development of HTML5-based games
  • Graphics in HTML5 (SVG, canvas)

The trainers will have to develop and deliver (before the end of year 2011) a new HTML5 online training course, aimed at existing Web developers and designers who need to get up to speed with the new and more complex media features available within HTML. The course will include extensive hands-on practical work, lectures, assignments, and such. Assignments would be based on examples related to application domains such as games, movies, online audio CD packaging, etc.

Please real the full details of this call for HTML5 trainers and send your application to Marie-Claire Forgue, W3C training manager.

This course is expanding W3C’s existing training program as part of the Open Media Web project funded by the European Community’s Seventh Framework programme.

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Get ready for HTML5 Graphics: Start the new year learning SVG – Early bird rate expiring soon!!

December 31, 2010

W3C is delighted to announce its latest online training course: Introduction to SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) which will start on Jan 10 2011.

SVG is getting increasingly important for Web designers given that

  • SVG now directly supported in HTML5
  • IE 9 will join all other major browsers in supporting the format.

This is the second time we run this course – here are some impressive examples of SVG applications that students in the first course were able to accomplish in their “final exam” after only five weeks of study:

We received excellent feedback on the first course – some examples of what participants in the previous course had to say:

  • “SVG is the future of graphics for web development. Anyone remotely interested in web dev needs to start learning it.”
  • “The format suits someone who may be working during the day, but has some time in the evenings to do some study”
  • “I really got infected by SVG! It’s an important part of the web-future (when there will be full cross-browser-support of SVG/SMIL) I gained knowledge and abilities that really impressed me.”
  • “You are at home; but not alone. There is feed-back and it is possible to get help. The course material and the assignments are high level, so later on when you are going to use it in your work, you have a god reference material.”
  • “A well taught course that thanks to the discussion group enables you to connect with some amazing individuals and allow you to expand your knowledge of the subject area well beyound whats in the course material itself.”

Full details on the content, the timing, who it’s for and more are available.

Early bird registration is available until January Jan 4 2011 at just €125 (after that, the cost will be €165).

Hope you can join us!

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Introduction to SVG: Online Course Open for Early Bird Registration

September 13, 2010

As part of the OMWeb Project, W3C will be running online training courses to help developers make the most of the latest opportunities in rich media on the Web. The first such course is an introduction to Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) which begins on Monday 11th October.

W3C began working on SVG, back in 1998 with stable standards first emerging in 2003 so it’s hardly ‘new.’ The standards have been implemented in a number of environments for years, however, as work on the second edition of the core standard is reaching the advanced stages of development, widespread attention has been prompted recently due to Microsoft’s announcement of its intention to provide native support for SVG within Internet Explorer 9. This means that all the major Web browsers from Apple, Google, Microsoft, Firefox and Opera support SVG natively. Cell phone and mobile device manufacturers like Ikivo, BitFlash, Apple, Qualcomm, Nokia, Sony Ericsson, Motorola, Samsung, LG, and Siemens all provide various levels of support too.

SVG’s time has come. It’s an incredibly powerful technology for creating high resolution, interactive, dynamic graphics to add real power to any Web site, whether viewed on a small screen or a stadium-sized display.

To lead the course, W3C is delighted to have secured the services of professor David Dailey of Slippery Rock University in Pennsylvania. Participants on the course will have access not only to materials created by Prof. Dailey but will receive feedback directly from him on assignments submitted and questions posed in the discussion forum.

Registration for the course is now open with full price at €125, but early bird registration is available until Friday 1st October for just €95.

Full details of the course content, how W3C online courses work and more can be found in the course description.

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