Archive for the ‘HTML5’ Category

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W3C HTML5 training course – New session starts 3 June!

May 30, 2013

Learn HTML5 cool new features and code slimming techniques that will hep you build interactive, powerful and efficient Web sites! Whatever you’re a beginner or a high level developer/designer, have access to high quality content material, be trained by a first-class expert, and learn step by step.

Registration is open for the W3C HTML5 training course that starts 3 June 2013 and lasts six weeks. Experienced trainer Michel Buffa will cover the techniques developers and designers need to create great Web pages and apps. Topics include video, animations, forms, and APIs to create location-based services, as well as offline applications. Students receive a certificate upon course completion.

Read the students’ feedback, as well as what was the trainer’s experience during the first course session earlier this year.

HTML5 simply rocks — enroll now!
During this 6 weeks long online training course, you will notably:

  • Learn the new simplified HTML5 tags
  • Play with the and elements
  • Draw and animate fun Web graphics
  • Discover the newest HTML5 forms features
  • Test the geolocation, orientation APIs and much more
  • Understand the HTML5 offline features

Register and learn more about W3DevCampus, W3C’s online training for Web developers.

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New HTML5 training course! – Early bird until 22 Feb.

February 15, 2013

W3C HTML5 logo

W3C is pleased to launch a new “HTML5″ training course!

Experienced trainer Michel Buffa will cover the techniques developers and designers need to create great Web pages and apps. Topics include video, animations, forms, and APIs to create location-based services, and offline applications.

The W3C HTML5 online course starts 18 March and lasts six weeks. Students will have access to high quality content material, be trained by a first-class expert, and receive a certificate upon course completion.

During the HTML5 course, students will:

  • Learn the new simplified HTML5 tags
  • Play with the <audio> and <video> elements
  • Draw and animate fun Web graphics
  • Discover the newest HTML5 forms features
  • Test the geolocation, orientation APIs and much more
  • Understand the HTML5 offline features

Read the W3C HTML5 training detailed course description, and register before February 22 to benefit from the early bird rate.

Learn more about W3DevCampus, the W3C online training for Web developers.

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TV, social media and Web apps at the 3rd FOKUS Media Web Symposium

February 6, 2013

Do not miss the upcoming 3rd FOKUS Media Web Symposium, March 14-15 2013!

Media and mobile Web experts, technology vendors and content providers are invited to meet in the vibrant city of Berlin, Germany, to spot and set trends as well as draw future roadmaps of Applications, Content and Technologies for a multiscreen world. The bulk of services in today’s mass market as well as the markets of the future will be based on Web technologies. Contents and Internet based services are being delivered to PCs, game consoles, TVs, smartphones, tablets and even cars.

3rd FOKUS Media Web Symposium bannerAt the 3rd Fraunhofer FOKUS Media Web Symposium, we will discuss which technical gaps and barriers have to be cleared to address all kind of viewers in a multiscreen environment. We will even go a step further opening for new business domains since Web based media technologies will be used for more than pure entertainment in the future. Smarter Cities and Internet of Things are also on the symposium’s agenda, which looks like this:

  • Day 1:
    • Two tutorials on Connected TV and Multiscreen App Development
    • Two workshops on:
      • TV – hybrid, smart, social, multiscreen – what is next?
      • Web Technologies for Smart Cities & Internet of Things
  • Day 2: Conference sessions on Smart Cities, Streaming Media, Web Apps, and more.
    • Dave Raggett (W3C team) will notably present “Smart cities as a Web of people, things and services

Registration is open and you still have time to benefit from the early bird ratebefore 14 February 2013!

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HTML5 for Games: Gap Analysis

December 14, 2011

HTML5 logoWe just published the final version of a report on the “HTML.next for Games” event (PDF) we ran this September (a earlier version is available in HTML).

HTML5 enables the development of games that run across devices, and are both easy to deploy and easy to maintain. Several features that are not yet part of the Web platform would be directly useful for games development, though. The workshop was the occasion to engage with the games community and to start listing features of interest. Workshop participants (including people from Bocoup, Google, Mozilla, RIM, Tecnalia, Wooga) were passionate about games and Web technologies. During the workshop, more than 20 features that would enable the development of better games using regular Web technologies were reviewed, refined and classified:

  • 12 new features were identified, such as the need for a Joystick API, a mouse lock mechanism, an orientation lock mechanism, or high performance timers
  • Standardization has already started for 5 features such as accurate sound triggering or real-time peer-to-peer communications.
  • A few other features mentioned require more discussion, or were seen as out of scope for standardization in W3C.

This report describes the main use case for each of the features of interest and includes a short gap analysis of today’s (end of November 2011) Web platform from the point of view of game development. Where applicable, the W3C working group and links to possible draft proposals are mentioned.

To ensure that games community needs are known and properly addressed in W3C, the W3C Games Community Group was created at the end of the workshop. This group is dedicated to tracking the implementation of Open Web Platform features directly relevant for games development, and communicating how to build games on the Open Web Platform to the general public.

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Web and TV: Device Discovery Identified as Top Requirement for Home Networking

December 7, 2011

With HTML5, Web technology is becoming a serious contender for implementing applications that in the past required writing native code. Much of the excitement around HTML5 is focusing on its new audio and video capabilities. So it’s only natural to look at to what extent Web technology can be used to implement today’s and future home-networking applications, such as “second screen” scenarios or access to home media servers.

That’s exactly what W3C’s Web and TV Interest Group did in recent months. They just published the result of their deliberations: a requirements document. Not only that, the group identified a major gap in current Web technology: the lack of device discovery, i.e. a means for an application to discover services and applications available on the home network.

As a consequence, work on device discovery for home networking has now started in the W3C Device API (DAP) WG . Most of the discussion is currently focussing on Web Intents, which has its own mailing list. Non-Web-Intents proposals for device discovery have been proposed by Opera/Cable Labs and the EU Webinos project.

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The “future TV” discussions in Rennes

November 15, 2011

The W3C/OMWeb team will participate at the upcoming “Recontres INRIA-Industries” event, this Thursday 17 November, in Rennes, France. This joint research-industry event will focus on topics such as: “What new standards to come? What new services to deploy? What opportunities for the 3D TV, the connected TV, and the interactive TV?”. The event programme will cover these topics and more.

Through a talk by François and demos at a booth, OMWeb will report on the W3C Web&TV impressive work initiated a year ago, with 3 workshops around the globe (Tokyo (Sept. 2010), Berlin (Feb. 2011), Hollywood (Sept. 2011)), the creation of a dedicated Interest Group and two task forces: the Home Network Task Force and the Media Pipeline Task Force. OMWeb will also demonstrate the power of HTML5 that will trigger new usages and services which will pave the road of the future TV…

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Report on Games workshop published

October 10, 2011

W3C HTML5 logo

Two weeks ago, we had the occasion to join the games community during onGameStart, the first HTML5 Games conference. Speakers at the conference explored many facets of games development using Web technologies, things that work, things that don’t. To explore game developers needs further and gather inputs for HTML.next, we organized a workshop the day after the conference. The workshop report is now available.

Workshop participants included people from Bocoup, Google, Mozilla, RIM, Tecnalia, and Wooga, all passionate about games and Web technologies. During the workshop, more than 20 features that would enable the development of better games using regular Web technologies were reviewed, refined and classified, leading to the identification of 11 new features of particular interest for the games community, namely:

To push for the inclusion of these features within W3C working groups charters, track standardization progress in W3C, and discuss potential other features directly relevant to the development of games using Web technologies, a Games Community Group was proposed and created at the end of the workshop. This group is also to communicate how to build games on the Open Web Platform to the general public.

A community group is a discussion forum open to anyone, without fees, particularly well suited to serve as coordination point for a particular community within W3C. Are you interested in the progress of the Web platform for games development? Join the Games Community group!

Building on the success of this first workshop, we will run a W3C Games Community Group Summit on 3 November 2011, next to the New Game Conference in San Francisco. Stay tuned on the Open Media Web Blog for announcement!

Check the full workshop report for details. Also, if you want to learn more about building games with Web technologies, check and register for the online training course on Game development in HTML5.

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